Newspaper Research 1893-1973

Now you can read historical Belmar newspapers from the turn of the century on your home computer! The BHS is proud to offer digital access to a wealth of history contained in the pages of the Coast Advertiser newspaper from 1893 to 1973.

Read original editions from 1893-1973 to learn more about Belmar's proud history!

Read original editions from 1893-1973 to learn more about Belmar’s proud history!

Take a moment to browse the history of Belmar by linking to our extensive file of Coast Advertiser from 1893 to 1973.  Click this link COAST ADVERTISER RESEARCH  to explore the fascinating history of Belmar, research your family tree, read about the life and times that are the foundation for our wonderful town from the original articles in the Coast Echo/Coach Advertiser newspaper.  For example, you may be surprised to know how ‘F’ Street (now Main Street) was such a thriving business community in the early 1900’s.  READ MORE

As you browse through the pages of Belmar history, you will be able to read the advertisements from the era, track what the leaders of the town were doing and how they envisioned Belmar.  We are certain you will find it a fascinating experience and may run across ancestors of people related to you or who you know today!

The Coast Echo began publishing a weekly paper in or around 1893. In the beginning, the newspaper reported news primarily of happenings in Ocean Beach (now Belmar) and Wall Township.  In 1909 the name of the newspaper was changed to the Coast Advertiser, and eventually expanded the news to include surrounding towns such as Spring Lake and Avon. The newspaper stopped printing at the end of 1973.

The newspaper reported the political development of Belmar as well as the residential and business growth of the town. Then the railroad expanded in the late 1800’s to bring visitors further and further south , as far as Belmar, more and more people bought lots in town.  Summer homes began sprining up, streets were mapped out, public buildings such as schools, churches and ire houses were built, and the town began to grow rapidly.  The newspaper chronicles all of this growth as well as news from council meetings, little snippets of gossip such as who is visiting from out of town, the summer openings of the hotels including a list of guest, and carnivals on Silver Lake.

The digitization of this historical newspaper collection is an ongoing project  of the BHS, with approximately 26 more years to put to microfilm and digitize. BHS volunteers are working steadily to raise the funds to continue the digitization of the remaining Coast Echo/Advertiser editions and hope to make these documents also available within the next few years.